Posts tagged “poem

Thoughts of a Dying Tree – Poem

(Image Source) (My original post with this poem)

Together we were connected.

But now I am emaciated

A community truncated

A lifeform regulated

A being amputated

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Life I protected

Now neglected

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Architected

Isolated

Maimed

Claimed

Tamed

Used

Me

I


I Sit Beside the Fire and Think – Tolkien

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I sit beside the fire and think
of all that I have seen
of meadow-flowers and butterflies
in summers that have been;

Of yellow leaves and gossamer
in autumns that there were,
with morning mist and silver sun
and wind upon my hair.

I sit beside the fire and think
of how the world will be
when winter comes without a spring
that I shall ever see.

For still there are so many things
that I have never seen:
in every wood in every spring
there is a different green.

I sit beside the fire and think
of people long ago
and people who will see a world
that I shall never know.

But all the while I sit and think
of times there were before,
I listen for returning feet
and voices at the door

I Sit Beside the Fire and Think is a song by Bilbo Baggins, which he sang softly in Rivendell on 24 December T.A. 3018, the evening before the Fellowship of the Ring set out upon their quest. Bilbo sang the song in the presence of Frodo, after giving Frodo the mithril-coat and Sting. The song is a contemplative piece, sung by a now-aging hobbit recalling past events that ends in anticipation of hearing returning friends.

But could it also have another meaning? A longing for the return of ancient ways? For the return of the spring after a long and cold winter?

Source for poem: Tolkien Gateway


Time and Eternity – Emily Dickinson

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“DEPARTED to the judgment,
A mighty afternoon;
Great clouds like ushers leaning,
Creation looking on.

The flesh surrendered, cancelled,
The bodiless begun;
Two worlds, like audiences, disperse
And leave the soul alone.”

“Departed to The Judgement”- Emily Dickinson

READ MORE EMILY DICKINSON POEMS HERE


Prayer to Cernunnos

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I sing this prayer to the Old One

To the Lord of the Hunt

To the wild, dancing, mischievous masculine. 

To the soul guide and path finder. 

Cernunnos 

Lead my arrow true 

Fill me with virility 

That I may stand strong and proud 

Travel far and sleep well 

Ride hard, sing loud 

And drink deep of all that is set before me. 

(Editorial Note: I did not write this prayer. I found it on the internet. I don’t know who the original author is, or else I would give them credit. I also took out one line, because it created a conflict between Wiccans and Celtic Pagans.)


Samhain Poem – Primeval Masks

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Enter that doorway to the nether-realm, my face with a mask concealed

The crisp leaves crunch churning under my steps upon a path not yet revealed

The air hangs heavy with looming spirits, roaming gusts of electric static

The dead and gone are not forever forlorn on this night of fear and magic

The fabric to that other world becomes a silken shimmer

Velvet walls in Death’s dark hall are far more than tale and glimmer.

By dawning this mask I may seem to hide my Earthly mortal vissage

Yet my inner beast now shines more true, my primeval power manifested


Lughnasadh Poem

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Lughnasadh Poem

Between the peaks of the sun’s golden height

To the browning leaves and fading light

Lies the thresh hold between the summer and autumn

A day to harvest the fruits from Nature’s bosom

  

A day to reap what you’ve sewn

A day to eat what you’ve grown

The taste of our labors sweet on our lips

And heavy baskets on our hips

 

Lugh the shining one stands bright and tall

His long arm extended, his hand grasps all

But now he sits in the shade of his mother

Ending one season, bringing in another

  

I give thanks for the fruits of light and reason

And hope for yet another successful season

Burying my dreams within the fertile earth

And awaiting our mother’s next healthy birth

 

LINKS

lugh

Image Source

 

Happy Lammas, Lughnasadh, Frefaxi all!

All About Lammas

FreyFaxi


Powerful Words from the New Orleans Poet, Sunni Patterson

“Injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere”

A great note to end the week with, some spiritual brilliance from this internationally known New Orleans poet.

According to her bio, Sunni’s mission is to aid in the awakening, the revival, and the remembrance of our gifts and voices, enabling us to move to a greater space of self empowerment, creativity and actualization.

I noticed the African words in the middle of the poem are names of the West African, Yoruba Gods. I think it’s interesting that she chose to put them in the middle of the poem deliberately. On my blog you can also read more about Yoruba or the Gods of Yoruba.

SUNNI PATTERSON’S OFFICIAL WEBSITE

TEXT OF POEM:

We have not always found comfort in killers.
We have not always found solace being rocked
in the bosoms of those who silently pray
and openly destroy.
No, not always have we mistaken mimicry for mastery
or pretending for knowing
or enslavement for freedom.
But across my memory —-
across my memory marches millions -—
bold, regal, resilient, confident —-
unshackled feet stumping up spirits
to guide us through this fickle material world.
We like sun and moon folk,
universal souls praying our prayers,
singing our songs.
Eshu, Ogoun, Shango, Yemaja, Oshun, Obatala, Oya,
Damballah, Ayida Wedo, Loa, Nkongo, Olodumare and Yami.
We know all of you by name.
We are people of beginnings, of culture, of strength.
Not always have we given into the empty threats
and scare tactics of the powerless ones.
Not always have we allowed the blood of our sons and daughters
to color the streets while we’re walking asleep,
marching to the beat of that siren song.
They’re still wearing their sheets,
with nooses in reach,
showing their teeth and smiling, it seems.
But I hear in the breeze
in the rustle of the trees
and the dangling of the feet,
they say, please, don’t let them ever forget.
You see, not always have we suffered from amnesia.
Not always have we forgotten how to conjure up spirits,
ancestor wisdom,
fix up a mixture,
spiritual elixir,
ancient traditions.
We, like magicians,
god-like vision, we -—
we are people of sight.
So, no, not always have we fallen
for this okie doke
or inhaled the hazardous smoke of the manipulators
or been satisfied with crumbs for meals
our hands have prepared.
Hughes said life for us ain’t been no crystal stair,
but at least the steps are there
to push us up higher,
teach us how to go beyond the destroyer’s disguises,
look them in the eyes and be able to see.
Because what’s surprising when you know the nature of a beast
and especially when they’ve shown the same face for centuries?
So you tell me,
what’s the difference between two sisters in New Orleans
shot point-blank in the back of the head,
and two women bound in their car in Baghdad?
Or government-sanctioned killings in Kenya,
and a sister held hostage in a house in Virginia?
Or poverty in Haiti, poverty in Jamaica,
rape in Rwanda or rape in Somalia?
A sweatshop in China or one in Guatemala?
Or small pox and blankets, syphilis and Tuskegee,
formaldehyde and FEMA, ethnic cleansing and Katrina?
I recall within a speech Dr. King made us aware,
he said injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere.
So they can spare us their drama, huh?
We got the heart of them field working mamas.
We carry the torch of that ancestor fire.
So with every fiber that flutters in our being,
with every find that comes from our seeking,
with every hearing that comes from our listening,
and every sight that comes from our seeing,
we must be faithful, strategic, victorious and free.